Balmoral Curlew

Balmoral Curlew

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This large equestrian sculpture is cast in fine bone china, and portrays Balmoral Curlew, a Highland pony owned and bred by H.M. Queen Elizabeth II. Read more...

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Mr Vitality

Mr Vitality

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This large special commission equestrian study of the 1996 Hong Kong champion racehorse is cast in fine bone china and portrays Mr Vitality with jockey, Basil Marcus, in the saddle. Read more...

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The first stage in the creation of each sculpture is the original clay model. The highly skilled sculptor works with reference material such as photographs and video images, and in the case of a specific subject such as a race horse may even go to visit the animal to ensure that every detail is correct. Next, the moulds from which the finished pieces will be cast must be prepared; a hugely skilled and responsible job, as it is likely that the original sculpture will have to be cut up in the process.


Each sculpture is made from many separate pieces, each cast individually then painstakingly assembled using liquid clay as an adhesive before the finished piece is fired in the kiln. The fragile model is then carefully glazed, using a light, satin glaze that retains every nuance and texture of its subject. Only then does the job of painting the sculpture begin, using a palette of specially prepared ceramic colours to capture all the natural tones of skin or fur. The delicate piece will require several further firings in the kiln to seal the colours permanently into place.